Presenter Information

Joy Jordan-Lake

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Location

Zoom

Event Website

http://www.belmont.edu/liberal-arts/humanities_symposium/

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

1-10-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

1-10-2020 11:20 AM

Description

In this interactive session, we will look at several examples of novels in classic literature concerned with social justice and how they attempted to bring about seismic change—or at least a shift in readers’ perspectives. Despite the flaws contemporary readers can find with Uncle Tom’s Cabin, for example, Harriet Beecher Stowe powerfully used the vehicle of story to make her case for abolition. So effective was her persuasion, in fact, that numerous other authors attempted to imitate her tropes and plot devices for the pro-slavery cause—with chilling results. Analyzing such deeply traditional images as mothers with children or romantic courtships, we’ll investigate how certain authors have employed these to suggest a radically different political or economic order. Comparing the potential of fiction to whitewash the past (e.g. Gone with the Wind) or lay it bare (e.g. Toni Morrison’s Beloved), we’ll consider various classic and contemporary American novels, their part in the ongoing dialogue of democracy, and their role, at least potentially, in giving voice to a healthy, thriving, increasingly diverse culture.

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Featured Speaker

Introduction by Dr. Andrea Stover

Moderated by Dr. Maggie Monteverde

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Oct 1st, 10:30 AM Oct 1st, 11:20 AM

Unearthing the Past, Rebuilding the Present: the Role of Fiction in Addressing History, Re-Imagining Human Community and Enacting Social Change

Zoom

In this interactive session, we will look at several examples of novels in classic literature concerned with social justice and how they attempted to bring about seismic change—or at least a shift in readers’ perspectives. Despite the flaws contemporary readers can find with Uncle Tom’s Cabin, for example, Harriet Beecher Stowe powerfully used the vehicle of story to make her case for abolition. So effective was her persuasion, in fact, that numerous other authors attempted to imitate her tropes and plot devices for the pro-slavery cause—with chilling results. Analyzing such deeply traditional images as mothers with children or romantic courtships, we’ll investigate how certain authors have employed these to suggest a radically different political or economic order. Comparing the potential of fiction to whitewash the past (e.g. Gone with the Wind) or lay it bare (e.g. Toni Morrison’s Beloved), we’ll consider various classic and contemporary American novels, their part in the ongoing dialogue of democracy, and their role, at least potentially, in giving voice to a healthy, thriving, increasingly diverse culture.

https://repository.belmont.edu/humanities_symposium/2020/2020/3